A List of Pet-Friendly Plants


Introduction

There are hundreds of pet-friendly plants to choose from, but there are also many that'll cause significant problems when ingested. Scroll down to see a definitive list for both toxic and non-toxic houseplants. Click on any of the plant hyperlinks to learn about their care requirements, common issues, origins, propagation tips & repotting facts!

To find your specific plant easier, either click on the 'Share' button & press 'Find On Page' with phones, or via Control F on computers (Command F on Apple Mac).


Need the answer to a specific plant query? Book a 1-to-1 video call with Joe Bagley, the website's friendly author, to overcome and address your niggling problem! Available on iMessage, WhatsApp, Facebook Messenger & more.




Pet-Friendly


Burro's Tail or Sedum morganianum is a great trailing succulent to have, predominantly due to it's easy-care nature.



We've just opened our online shop!

Want to buy top quality products with FREE Delivery? Click here to view our new store, including everything from indoor potting mixes to moss pole hooks.


'Houseplant Potting Mix'. £4.79 + FREE Delivery!



  • Ferns - Boston Ferns, Maidenhair Ferns, Rabbit Foot Ferns, Blue Star Ferns, & Others
  • Fittonia - Nerve Plants
  • Gerbera - Barberton Dais
  • Gloxinia
  • Grape Ivy - Cissus


Calathea are one of the most interesting pet-friendly plants to have around the house, due to the movement of leaves at night.


Maidenhair Ferns or Adiantum are an excellent pet-friendly option for both beauty & delicacy.






A flowering-favourite that's been in homes for over 150 years - Streptocarpus. It's non toxic and can bloom for up to six months in the correct environment!


Poisonous to Pets


Although Aloe vera is great medically, eating raw sections of the leaves could result in poisoning, especially for dogs & cats.


Citrus Trees have both edible and highly poisonous parts. Although the fruits can be eaten once ripe, the latex sap and sharp thorns are definitely a no-no for hungry pets.


The Dracaena's sap has a wealth of history over the years, from being a violin colourant in the 1800s to aiding red hair-dye. Unfortunately, Dracaena are also poisonous due to its resinous sap which causes nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea if digested.



Despite its prominent fixture in Chinese restaurants, Jade trees are classified as highly poisonous.


String of Pearls are undeniably intriguing, but holds sinister health issues if ingested...



Book a 1-to-1 Call with Joe Bagley

If you need further advice with your houseplants, book an advice call with ukhouseplants' friendly and expert writer today! This can be done via a video or audio call on most apps, including Facebook, FaceTime & Skype. A ten-minute call costs £5.99  (US$7),  or £15.99 for thirty minutes. You can ask multiple questions, including queries on plants, pests, terrariums, repotting advice and anything in between. Please consider supporting this service to keep ukhouseplants thriving!


Comments
* The email will not be published on the website.